Here are some resources for anyone who wants to read up on fandom history, including outlines, old fan fiction, and certain famous drama. Made especially for all the teenagers out there who believe that tumblr created the concept of fandom. (more masterposts)
T H E   B E G I N N I N G S   ( P R E - 1 9 9 0   F A N D O M )

Precursors to Fan FictionThere have been several works that could most definitely be considered the beginnings of fan fiction, and most of them are quite surprising.
The Brontë siblings spent much of their child to young adulthood writing short stories and novels telling the fantasy adventures of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. (x)
Sherlock HolmesDespite the buzz around Star Trek being the first, the origin of the modern idea of “fandom” can be traced all the way back to 1887 with the creation of Arthur Conan Doyle’s world famous detective. As well as some of the first ever fan fiction. 
Here’s a video detailing how Holmes started fanfiction. (x)
A blog post about the changes in Sherlock Holmes fandom over time. (x)
"The Adventure of the Two Collaborators" a fanfiction by the creator of Peter Pan. (x)
Star TrekNow we’re at the big one. The real big fandom creator. The Original Series didn’t have a big audience during it’s original run, but those who did watch it were deeply invested in it. This means conventions, mailing groups, fan magazines, and fanfiction presses. 
Spockanalia, the first ever fanzine, appeared in September 1967. Celebrating fan art and even fan fiction. The zine ran from 67’-70’, and published five issues. (x) (x) (x)
The first fan convention occurred in March of 1969. The “Star Trek Con” did not have celebrity guests but did have “slide shows of ‘Trek’ aliens, skits and a fan panel to discuss ‘The Star Trek Phenomenon.’” (x)
"Star Trek Lives!" was the first large scale con and it was in 1970. They expected 500 people, they had to turn down people when there was 3000. (x)
Kirk/Spock is the first official slash ever, and was largely circulated due to fanzines. (x) (x) (x)

E A R L Y   D A Y S   O F   T H E   I N T E R N E T   ( T H E   1 9 9 0 ’ S )

GeocitiesIn 1995, Geocities was born. If you haven’t heard of Geocities(due to it’s death in 2009), it was a Web hosting service, separated into ‘neighborhoods’ named after real cities for what they were famous for. Here, many fandoms shared fan fiction.  Back in the day, fandoms had to create their own private spaces. This made fandoms on the internet smaller and less accessible than fanzine operated ones.
geocities archive (x)
the death of Geocities (x)
Fanfiction.net1998 brought fanfiction.net into existence to compete with the hundreds of independent, fandom-oriented fanfiction archives. More democratization, although fanfiction was marketed on how many reviews one had.
In 2002, due to legal concerns, fanfiction.net bans NC-17 fanfiction. (x)
Adultfanfiction.net is created to fill the void. For years, 13 year olds would pretend to be 18 to enter. That is until, people figure out they can just post it on fanfiction under M. (x)

E A R L Y   2 0 0 0 ’ S   T O   N O W 

The Cassie Clare ControversyYou might recognize Cassandra Clare from the YA series The Mortal Instruments, but in the early 2000s people remember her a bit differently. As a Harry Potter fan fiction writer who caused a big old controversy. 
The Draco Trilogy is a Draco-centric epic written and posted by Cassandra Claire over a period of six years. It was quite popular, and was one of the longest Harry Potter fics out there. (x)
People noticed however, that she lifted scenes and dialog straight from other fiction, causing an uproar and Cassie to be banned from fanfiction.net. (x)
ForumsAround this time, forums come around. People rapidly gained and lost power, causing quick turnover in these parts of fandom. (x)
tumblr.In 2007, tumblr is created, however it doesn’t really become popular until 2010 and due to the death of Geocities and other popular websites for fandom and it’s less strict guidelines, it becomes a major fandom stronghold. 
Tumblr and fandom (x)

Here are some resources for anyone who wants to read up on fandom history, including outlines, old fan fiction, and certain famous drama. Made especially for all the teenagers out there who believe that tumblr created the concept of fandom.
(more masterposts)

T H E   B E G I N N I N G S   ( P R E - 1 9 9 0   F A N D O M )

Precursors to Fan Fiction
There have been several works that could most definitely be considered the beginnings of fan fiction, and most of them are quite surprising.

  • The Brontë siblings spent much of their child to young adulthood writing short stories and novels telling the fantasy adventures of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. (x)

Sherlock Holmes
Despite the buzz around Star Trek being the first, the origin of the modern idea of “fandom” can be traced all the way back to 1887 with the creation of Arthur Conan Doyle’s world famous detective. As well as some of the first ever fan fiction. 

  • Here’s a video detailing how Holmes started fanfiction. (x)
  • A blog post about the changes in Sherlock Holmes fandom over time. (x)
  • "The Adventure of the Two Collaborators" a fanfiction by the creator of Peter Pan. (x)

Star Trek
Now we’re at the big one. The real big fandom creator. The Original Series didn’t have a big audience during it’s original run, but those who did watch it were deeply invested in it. This means conventions, mailing groups, fan magazines, and fanfiction presses. 

  • Spockanalia, the first ever fanzine, appeared in September 1967. Celebrating fan art and even fan fiction. The zine ran from 67’-70’, and published five issues. (x) (x) (x)
  • The first fan convention occurred in March of 1969. The “Star Trek Con” did not have celebrity guests but did have “slide shows of ‘Trek’ aliens, skits and a fan panel to discuss ‘The Star Trek Phenomenon.’” (x)
  • "Star Trek Lives!" was the first large scale con and it was in 1970. They expected 500 people, they had to turn down people when there was 3000. (x)
  • Kirk/Spock is the first official slash ever, and was largely circulated due to fanzines. (x) (x) (x)

E A R L Y   D A Y S   O F   T H E   I N T E R N E T   ( T H E   1 9 9 0 ’ S )

Geocities
In 1995, Geocities was born. If you haven’t heard of Geocities(due to it’s death in 2009), it was a Web hosting service, separated into ‘neighborhoods’ named after real cities for what they were famous for. Here, many fandoms shared fan fiction.  Back in the day, fandoms had to create their own private spaces. This made fandoms on the internet smaller and less accessible than fanzine operated ones.

  • geocities archive (x)
  • the death of Geocities (x)

Fanfiction.net
1998 brought fanfiction.net into existence to compete with the hundreds of independent, fandom-oriented fanfiction archives. More democratization, although fanfiction was marketed on how many reviews one had.

  • In 2002, due to legal concerns, fanfiction.net bans NC-17 fanfiction. (x)
  • Adultfanfiction.net is created to fill the void. For years, 13 year olds would pretend to be 18 to enter. That is until, people figure out they can just post it on fanfiction under M. (x)

E A R L Y   2 0 0 0 ’ S   T O   N O W 

The Cassie Clare Controversy
You might recognize Cassandra Clare from the YA series The Mortal Instruments, but in 
the early 2000s people remember her a bit differently. As a Harry Potter fan fiction writer who caused a big old controversy. 

  • The Draco Trilogy is a Draco-centric epic written and posted by Cassandra Claire over a period of six years. It was quite popular, and was one of the longest Harry Potter fics out there. (x)
  • People noticed however, that she lifted scenes and dialog straight from other fiction, causing an uproar and Cassie to be banned from fanfiction.net. (x)

Forums
Around this time, forums come around. People rapidly gained and lost power, causing quick turnover in these parts of fandom. (x)

tumblr.
In 2007, tumblr is created, however it doesn’t really become popular until 2010 and due to the death of Geocities and other popular websites for fandom and it’s less strict guidelines, it becomes a major fandom stronghold. 

  • Tumblr and fandom (x)

sdkay:

Some Sherlock BBC sketches.

books meme

esterbrook:

Rules: In a text post, list ten books that have stayed with you in some way. Don’t take but a few minutes, and don’t think too hard—they don’t have to be the “right” or “great” works, just the ones that have touched you. Tag friends, including me, so I’ll see your list. Make sure you let your friends know you’ve tagged them. I was tagged by mydwynter.

  1. Harriet the Spy - Louise Fitzhugh
  2. Lord of the Rings - JRR Tolkien
  3. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
  4. A People’s History of the United States - Howard Zinn
  5. The Handmaid’s Tale - Margaret Atwood
  6. Maurice - E.L. Forster
  7. I, Claudius - Robert Graves
  8. The Diary of Anne Frank
  9. The Silver Metal Lover - Tanith Lee
  10. Understanding the Borderline Mother - Christine Lawson

No particular theme here, other than that I had a hard time narrowing my list down to 10! If I’d kept going to 20, there would be a lot more nonfiction on the list.

I tag bandersnatchmycummerbund, destinationtoast, and @significanceofmoths, should they care to play along.

I have still not read Tanith Lee! Thanks for the reminder, will rectify. I already did this at some point and went on and on so I’m not gonna do it again just now but I am going to add one I just thought of which is Pattern Recognition by William Gibson— the heroine, Cayce Pollard (I think?) has a theory of wearing clothing that I relate to 100% and it has always stuck with me as an amazing description of one of my lifetime style goals.

skulls-and-tea:

deducingbbcsherlock:

see-but-do-not-observe:

Look at how smug and confident he was when he entered the restaurant… But the moment he saw John for the first time after two years he turned into a nervous puppy. Sherlock Holmes was actually stunned for a moment,

that.

Someone gif’d the moment! Thank zeus. 

It was only a split second; I missed it on the first few watches, but once I saw it I couldn’t unsee it. 

It makes a huge difference in watching the restaurant reunion: without it, the disguise scene feels like a gimmicky writing gag.

With it: the scene is a heartbreaking tapdance of nerves and deflection.

impossible girls →

elizabethminkel:

unreconstructedfangirl:

elizabethminkel:

SNIP 

What I love about this idea is the generosity of it. I think there’s so often a real paucity of generosity towards writers/creators in fandom, and really, isn’t it ok for him to want to be the Doctor? To tell the story about the Doctor rather than making it about the companion who is usually a woman? I can’t see why, on a basic level, it isn’t ok for a man to tell a man’s story. I mean, I get that there is no shortage of such narratives, and that there are shortages of others, but for me, the blame for that doesn’t lie with the writer of such a story, it lies with the people who commission and fund stories, and with the audience that consumes stories and what it demands and rewards with its custom.

I think people forget, too, that a narrative is an exercise in a certain kind of economy, and that in order to tell one story, one cannot tell every story. Most narratives work by constellating characters and plot around a protagonist, and there can’t be lose threads and extra details — the other characters and the things that happen in the story are there further that agenda. If, for Moffat, the story is fundamentally about the Doctor, then it is appropriate that the other characters in the story serve narrative purposes that support that agenda, and as I said, there are lots of ways of looking at the story as presented and not all of them amount to unforgivable misogyny.

Every fan has a way they want it to be, and so many just aren’t willing to accept the fact that just because the story goes a certain way in their heads (or SHOULD go a certain way) doesn’t mean that’s the only way it can go in anyone’s head, or in the writer’s head, and still be of value. Our ideas and feelings about who the characters are and what they mean aren’t the only ways to think about them. I think it’s perfectly all right that Moffat has a different vision, and that he has a different desire to be fulfilled when writing his story, and it’s also perfectly all right that some people preferred a different approach. What I don’t always understand is why that has to lead to categorical accusations of personal evil and all the personal reviling. Moffat is clearly a very talented and intelligent person, who works side by side with a host of other intelligent and talented people, and I think he deserves a little generosity from his audience on the question. Or, at least the right to a learning curve rather than a summary, black and white dismissal.

IMHO.

And, tangentally, about Sherlock — I think it’s true that he is an iconic, narrative-driving masculine figure, but it’s important to note, in Moffat and Gatiss’s version, how sexualised and subjected to our (and John’s!) objectification he is with his too-tight shirts and the way the camera worships his prettiness. If I had the time to write a book, here, it wouldn’t be difficult to enumerate the ways in which Sherlock subverts that narrative and enters into a dialogue with it rather than presenting it straightforwardly, and I suspect it will go even further in that direction in the future. And, similarly to the Doctor’s heroism, Sherlock isn’t an uncomplicated, straighforward hero of the typical stamp, as much as he might like to see himself as a dragonslayer with a damsel to save. I mean, firstly, his damsel isn’t a damsel at all, but another complicated masculinity.

I know there are those of us who are rightfully sick to death about stories for boys, and I am, too, sometimes, but personally, I shop elsewhere for my feminine representation. Every work of art doesn’t have to be all things to all people, and I still find the stories men tell about themselves to be interesting and relevant to the aims of feminism.

elizabethminkel, thank you for starting this terribly interesting discussion!

Ahhhhhhhh I LOVE THIS SO MUCH. THANK YOU unreconstructedfangirl. If I wasn’t trying to plow through my poor old dissertation this afternoon I’d comment further, but I agree with so, so much of this. It’s incredibly well-put and super interesting, and something I wish I heard more of on a regular basis. Or, as Captain Jack might put it, it’s

 

I don’t really want to get way into this (there’s A LOT here and I have a lot of thoughts but meh) but I do just want to say that of course it’s okay that it’s a story about a man. I don’t think anyone takes issue with that— I know I don’t! But to imply that that is what people complain about is, I think, really dismissive of peoples’ actual concerns about sexism in Who. Deep Breath was upsetting to me to watch, not because it was primarily about the Doctor (which actually I wouldn’t say that it was, at all) but because there were completely unnecessary sexist jokes sprinkled throughout and that is what I have an issue with. I didn’t think the bit where Vastra is making Jenny pose prettily for her under false pretenses was funny and cute; I thought it was stupid and gross. This isn’t the mutually respectful couple we originally met, this is a lesbian couple cast in heteronormative sitcom stereotypical gender roles. Yuck! My problem with Moffat’s DW writing is that this is the rule, not the exception; these moments are scattered through every episode he writes. And that IS a problem.

(Source: sherlockbbcgifs)

plays

spiritcc:

Time for some related videos. 

A Russian parody, the funniest thing ever existed on this planet

lotrlockedwhovian:

notmydate:

It is John’s habit to pull the door closed by the knocker, making it hang to the left.  But notice that Sherlock’s practice is not to adjust the knocker to the left, but to the right. He’s annoyed to see that Mycroft has straightened it.  To Sherlock’s mind, it should hang to the right if he is at home with John, or to the left, if John is out. 

These little tiny details are what take this show to some next level shit.

doublenegativemeansyes:

we  don’t  mind.

doublenegativemeansyes:

we  don’t  mind.

solveitsherlock:

it’s an underground network

solveitsherlock:

it’s an underground network

Just the two of us against the rest of the world

(Source: watsonsdick)

 “A nice murder. That’ll cheer you up”

(Source: jamesmoriatty)

thetwelfthpanda:

Hormones.

thetwelfthpanda:

Hormones.

Why I Love the Character of Sherlock

esterbrook:

archipelagoarchaea:

I’m a sucker for the jerk-with-a-heart-of-gold trope, and Sherlock is an excellent example of why. In fiction — as in real life — people often judge based solely on outward appearances and behavior. I do understand why, superficially: it’s a person’s actual behavior that affects the world around them, not what they’re like inside. But I think this is flawed reasoning, because it leads to charismatic psychopaths being praised while people like Sherlock are loathed. Thus the psychopaths continue to use and abuse until they take it a step too far and are caught out — if they ever do — while the damaged but potentially-good are abandoned and never given the encouragement to grow. Needless to say, I find this heartbreaking. The fictional reformation of a character like Sherlock is an emotional balm against the real-world tragedy of lives falling between the cracks.

Read More

This is good. This is very good.

damn-it-darcy:

(Full-view very strongly suggested; goddamn.)
I took down the original to make a few minor changes to John; apologies if you are therefore seeing this twice. Anyhow—. Attempt #2 in Paint Tool SAI. This program feels quite odd.
In which Sherlock Holmes looks as unreal as ever and we all live vicariously through John Watson in checking that shit out on the down-low.

damn-it-darcy:

(Full-view very strongly suggested; goddamn.)

I took down the original to make a few minor changes to John; apologies if you are therefore seeing this twice. Anyhow—. Attempt #2 in Paint Tool SAI. This program feels quite odd.

In which Sherlock Holmes looks as unreal as ever and we all live vicariously through John Watson in checking that shit out on the down-low.